BETTER MARKETING FOR BETTER BUSINESS

Sharing our thoughts on the world of today's media.

Customer Relations

Build Customer Trust

Louvre Media Build Customer Trust

Managing your online reviews is an important part of maintaining your company’s reputation and cannot be ignored. Online reviews build customer trust and create the opportunity for a consumer to choose your business. It can also improve local search rankings and increase your exposure on the internet, but that’s another topic altogether.

We recommend responding to reviews within 24 hours, if not sooner. It allows a business to show they care. Period. Responding to both positive and negative reviews is important. Consumers who leave reviews typically are active online and will appreciate the quick feedback. Thanking someone for their positive review reinforces they reason they gave you a review in the first place. Addressing the issues on a negative review allows you the opportunity to have a conversation with the customer, rather than a one-sided story. You can also encourage them to contact you via other channels to address their issues or concerns. When responding to negative reviews, it is not only important to address their concerns, but also to work to resolve the issue. Sometimes good resolutions lead to a negative review being updated by the customer that left it. More importantly, when a potential customer sees that you are willing to fix issues and care about your other customers, it increases their trust and faith in you.

Managing online websites is easier than one may think. The top three websites where consumers leave reviews are Google, Facebook, and Yelp. All three of these pages can be easily claimed so you can see the reviews when they come in (you will have to set your notifications in order to know when a review has been submitted). There are companies which simplify the process and connect to more than these three websites and will notify you anytime a review for your business comes in across the internet.

References
https://www.revlocal.com/blog/review-and-reputation-management/2018-review-marketing-statistics-infographic
https://www.brightlocal.com/learn/local-consumer-review-survey/
https://www.reputation.com/resources/blog/8-tips-for-responding-to-negative-reviews/

Your Customer’s First Experience

You Never Get a Second Chance to Make a First Impression.

If you think about a time when you’ve gone into a nice hotel, you might recall a very friendly and professional employee opening the door and welcoming you to their establishment. There are certainly more than a few various types of businesses which have a greeter at the door, inviting you in, and making you feel welcome.

Make a First Impression

 

These are Great First Impressions.

For you, as a business owner, who is this person for your company? How do they rate at first impressions? More importantly, how do you know how they are doing? This could be the person who greets a customer when they walk into your store, or the person who answers the phone.

Do you dread calling larger companies these days, knowing the wait time will be several minutes, likely resulting in being disconnected? Have you ever walked into a business and had to look for someone to help you? Both examples are far below the levels of what you expect to see as a great first impression in customer service.

As a passionate business owner, or manage, who expects nothing but the best, how do you make sure your customers aren’t having experiences like both scenario’s above? Here are some quick tips on how to check (and if you aren’t the one doing the checking, make sure you are following up with the person who should be accountable for this):

  1. Set standards for people visiting your business and calling your business. What type of experience do you want your customer to have as their first impression?
  2. If you are a retail business (where customers come to you), observe. From either inside, or outside, the building. How are your employees measuring up to your standards?
  3. If you are a service or retail business, how is the phone etiquette? Call your place of business as a customer or listen to incoming calls (if you have a call recording system in place).
  4. Secret Shoppers. Enlist some family or friends to shop your business. Ask them for a written report, with as much detail as possible, about their experience. After reviewing the report, ask for clarification on any details you’re unsure about, and see how this tests up to your standards.

At first glance, it’s easy to see how this impacts your business. However, this can be quantified. Let’s look at the numbers. The numbers we are using are examples from the service industry.

Real life example. We work with many clients who have great tracking systems in place. One of them measures conversions of calls coming in from new customers. Companies that perform the best typically schedule (and service) seven out of ten new potential customers. When a company isn’t performing at it’s best they might schedule only 3.5 out of ten calls, the cost to acquire a new customer doubles. This means we must spend twice as much in getting calls, OR we get half as many calls at the same amount

of money. Either way it is costing us more money to acquire a new customer if we are not doing the best job in scheduling the calls, we already have coming in.

If you’re not sure what your cost per lead is, or how to make improvements to the first impression your company is putting out there, the best place to start is checking out how you are doing today. Moving forward from your initial findings, continue making improvements, and soon enough you’ll see. A little time spent here will be a big pay off in the long run.

The Value of the Customer Experience

How do you ensure your customers are having the most positive customer experience plausible?

Is it possible the value of your marketing and advertising results, or lack thereof, is in direct relationship with how your customers interact with your brand and how your customers are treated once they enter the door?

Imagine you have a great marketing strategy, and customers are coming into your storefront, but the sales numbers are still not hitting your desired mark. What would your next step be? Yes, we could throw some more money into marketing and advertising, and it may increase traffic for a short while. However, 9 times out of 10, when the sales aren’t converting, despite strong marketing efforts, it may be time to look internally at the quality of the customer experience.

Business Colleagues Together Teamwork Working Office

There are dozens of tools on the market nowadays to assess website analytics, listen to incoming calls, and to help identify where a breakdown may be happening. Do you know how your customer service representatives are answering the phone? Is your website getting traffic but you’re still not seeing any online transactions? Lastly, how are you responding to requests for refunds, returns, or exchanges? You may find it valuable to audit your incoming calls and do some coaching with your reps on how to better convert phone calls into sales. There’s also a chance customers don’t understand how to add items to their cart online or can’t find the product they are looking for on your website. Customers should be able to easily get in touch with your business for any issues related to their purchases, or they will be less likely to purchase from you again.

Some other things to consider: are your employees on the sales floor warmly greeting each person who walks in the door and answering their questions? Do you find value in ensuring the store is clean and tidy and easy to navigate? If you have social media, is your business responding to incoming comments, messages, and requests for information?

Additionally, do your customers feel valuable when they make a purchase? You may find value in customer appreciation efforts. A hand-written thank you note for buying a pair of glasses from your eye clinic, or a personal phone call for ordering a customized item online can let customers know their specific transaction was valuable. Even simpler, an automated ‘Thank You’ email after a purchase could do the trick, too.

Issues with revenue may sometimes be attributed to external factors or lack of attention to marketing. However, no amount of money invested in radio, print, and tv ads can convert a poor customer experience into sales for your business.